To undergo a sharp, rapid descent in value or price: dive, drop, fall, plummet, plunge, sink, skid, slump, tumble.

dive verb (IN WATER) B1. To come to the ground suddenly and involuntarily: drop, fall, go down, pitch, plunge, spill, topple, tumble. Reading the Simpsons comic book story ‘The End of El Barto’, I came across an interesting question of grammar, of all things.

Just make sure you pronounce dove /dəʊv/, to rhyme with ‘rove’ or ‘cove’. Macmillan Collocations Dictionary comes... Macmillan Dictionary – Free English Dictionary with Thesaurus, Macmillan Thesaurus – Free English Thesaurus Online, Open Dictionary – Crowdsourced Dictionary.

… I was diving on it last week.” So which is it? The OED’s first citation is from 1855, in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s Song of Hiawatha: ‘Straight into the river Kwasind Plunged as if he were an otter, Dove as if he were a beaver.’ In later editions Dove became Dived, perhaps under editorial influence. The anti-dove cruelty has to stop. Commenter Tod Hay points out that the “dived” usage is the older of the two and comes from old British English, twang and all.

Some examples include bite (bit), drive (drove), fly (flew) and take (took). The most popular (not always the most appropriate) comment came from user Brian Pallock, who said he shuns both dived and dove—and opts for an unconventional alternative. A typical example, “The Cape Breton? Dive definition, to plunge into water, especially headfirst. We offer a whole host of diving activities, events and courses in order to keep divers diving and enjoying this exciting and rewarding activity in BC.

If you pronounce it /dʌv/, to rhyme with ‘love’ or ‘shove’, you won’t get any peace. “Sure,” pro-dove commenter Bernie Schaloske responded, “but bass is a fish, and an instrument, and a vocal register… English is complicated!”. In English, verbs conjugate in many strange ways, and the word “dive” is no exception. To be clear, at BARE we believe you’re free to conjugate however you please. To jump into water head-first. Dived is an alternative form of dove. “It’s “dived” in the UK though. Home / Explore / Dived or dove?

Dove hung on, though, and soon spread to other dialects, especially in North America. Both verb inflections are used in American and British English; however, dove is an Americanism, and thus tends to be used more in American English.”, So there you have it: there’s officially no wrong way, grammatically, to go diving in the past tense.

“For me, being from the US, it’s dove,” he writes. I still do.

Check out Ginger's spelling book and make sure you never confuse dived and dove again! … I was diving on it last week.”, If you want a simple answer, the correct form is “dived.”.

The OED ’s first citation is from 1855, in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s Song of Hiawatha : ‘Straight into the river Kwasind Plunged as if he were an otter, Dove as if he were a beaver.’ While some sought out the grammatical extremes of the spectrum, others cried for unity amid the uproar. See more. It’s octopuses. Instead, the middle vowel changed. Historically, dive was a weak verb, so its past tense was dived. As he continues to explain in the thread, during a dive trip, the brits all laughed at him initially when he said “dove”. 2572 Arbutus Street, Vancouver BC V6J3Y2 Canada (view map), Free shipping available on any orders over $100. Or, if you want to avoid this problem just keep it shortened to octos and no diver will bat an eye. Personal preference enters the picture. That’s another story…. Like snuck, which featured in another Simpsons comic, dove is an emerging strong verb, bucking the usual pattern of regularization. Dived Is More Traditional Than Dove Dived is the traditional past tense and past participle of to dive, but dove has crept in over the last two centuries — particularly in the US. And while I often cringe at the idea of works like “irregardless” being accepted as a legitimate word, I accept and enjoy that languages, and English especially, evolve. You see, English has undergone a lot of changes over the years. “But dove is a bird!” many commenters insisted. Dived it? Sometime during my youth somone told me that “dived” was correct and that stuck with me until fairly recently. Act now—offer ends at midnight, November 30!

“But this sure is a dive-ided topic!”, According to one of the gold-standards of the English language, Merriam-Webster, “the words dived and dove are interchangeable as a past tense and past participle of the verb dive. “Either,” wrote BARE ambassador Joe Platko.

At some point this form of conjugation lost favour among English speakers. This is probably a result of the verb to drive (with its past tense drove) becoming more common. Editor’s Note: The opinions expressed below are those of Huish Outdoors copywriter Sam Morse. But since I started diving in my early 20s, it’s always seemed strange that the casual past-tense usage, “dove” isn’t more colloquially popular. Chief Wiggum is not the first person to be unsure of whether to use dived or dove as the past tense of dive. Once upon a time, the past tense of verbs wasn’t created by adding an -ed at the end of anything. Oh yeah, I dived it last week… dove it? But everyone’s got an opinion, so we took this hard-hitting, if not entirely important, question to our social media community recently to hear what they had to say. It’s not an Old English Strong Verb itself, but like drive & drove, dive & dove has a pleasing ring to it. As verbs the difference between dove and dived is that dove is strong-declension (dive) while dived is (dive) (scuba diving).

Dove is a relative newcomer, probably formed by analogy with drive–drove or strive–strove. So which is right? I know I have. Dove is a relative newcomer, probably formed by analogy with drive – drove or strive–strove .

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Growing up, every time the situation arose, grammar nerds would insist upon the proper usage being “dived.” And so I nodded in agreement. In the meantime, though, can we please stop with the octopi thing? If you used ‘divven’ in context, I bet people would understand you. According to the Dictionary of American Regional English, in the North, dove is more prevalent; in the South Midland, dived.

Dove for Americans. As Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage notes, the use of dove ‘is really governed by geography rather than by social class or notions of correctness’. Oh yeah, I dived it last week… dove it? We understand that this is a divisive issue and we believe you should be able to conjugate your verbs freely, and without judgement. Trained as a scientist and TEFL teacher, he writes about language, words, books and more on Sentence first, Macmillan Dictionary Blog and elsewhere. But everyone’s got an opinion, so we took this hard-hitting, if not entirely important, question to our social media community recently to. After it’s all said and done, perhaps the most important thing is that you dove/dived, at all.

“I just tell everyone that I wetted myself,” he explains. Both verb inflections are used in American and British English; however, dove is an Americanism, and thus tends to be used more in American English.” So while dove is quite new to the set of irregular English verbs, it is a popular choice and can be considered standard. Idiom: take a sudden downtrend. In some dialects it has overtaken dived. Of all the controversies in diving, one of the most hotly contested, surprisingly, revolves around an issue of grammar. Dove is a synonym of dived.

In the US, it can be quite difficult to get an accurate hold on what the correct past-tense usage is for the word. Stan Carey is a freelance editor, proofreader and writer from the west of Ireland.

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“But it sounds so wrong,” you argue.

‘Humpy’ the Whale Shuns Migration, Returns to River Instead. verb. Dived is actually the earlier form, and the emergence of dove may appear anomalous in light of the general tendencies of change in English verb forms. If you’ve ever tried to read something in English that predates Shakespeare you know what I mean.

Perhaps the closest similarity in English is with the word “drive.” You drove to the supermarket, you didn’t drived there. Dove is an Americanism that probably developed … So… I will self consciously use them interchangeably. The word’s omission from Fowler’s Modern English Usage, first and second editions, may have helped it slip under critics’ radar. A typical example, “The Cape Breton?

It almost seems like the past participle should be divven. What it means and how it conjugates To dive is an verb meaning : To swim under water To jump into water head-first To descend sharply or steeply Or, figuratively: To undertake with enthusiasm, or to plunge into a subject, question, business, etc.