The Pi…. In an email from a Pyrex representative it was noted that less than one-tenth of one percent of millions of Pyrex goods sold each year result in thermal breakage. There are a few ways you can tell before you invest in a nice set of borosilicate kitchenware. The trendy haircuts you’ll be seeing everywhere next year. Learn how to season this Southern kitchen staple in five easy steps. Borosilicate Glass has excellent thermal shock resistance. They're used in a range of applications, from high-temperature viewports to 3D printing. The company that bought the PYREX® trademark for Europe continues to use Borosilicate Glass. The brand has been around for over 100 years, and has established a reputation based on its material that was strong enough to be used in kitchens and laboratories alike. Read more on using the Socorex Calibrex Solutae 530 to dispense methadone. Borosilicate glass was first developed by German glassmaker Otto Schott in the late 19th century in Jena. Pyrex is one particular blend of Borosilicate glass, with a particularly high heating tolerance. The longest running scientific experiment has been running since 1927 and still has another 100 years to go! Pyrex pieces used to be made of borosilicate glass, which is more resistant to breakage when subjected to extreme shifts in temperature. However, borosilicate glass is not the same as Pyrex. After Corning Glass Works introduced Pyrex in 1915, the name became synonymous for borosilicate glass in the English-speaking world (in reality, a sizable portion of glass produced under the Pyrex brand has also been made of soda-lime glasssince the 1940s). Any Southern cook worth her salt knows and trusts several brand names when it comes to cook- and bakeware that gets the job done better than anything else. Borosilicate Glass has excellent thermal shock resistance. Are you curious if the glassware you have in your kitchen is already made of borosilicate? Also known as Pyrex and Schott glass, borosilicate sheets are heat resistant, clear, and have a super-smooth surface. It meant that the odds were in your favor when it came to your casserole dish making it safely from the icebox to the oven and back again. Borosilicate glass was invented earlier by German glassmaker, Otto Schott in the late 19th century and sold under the brand name "Duran" in 1893. Along with Le Creuset and Calphalon, Pyrex is one of those relied-upon brands for everything glass, from measuring cups to casserole dishes. Pyrex products were made of borosilicate glass until about 60 years ago, at which point they began switching to manufacturing products with tempered soda lime instead. It does not expand and contract like ordinary glass does when exposed to rapid changes in heat or cold. Invented in the late 1800s by German glassmaker Otto Schott, he introduced the world to borosilicate glass in 1893 under the brand name Duran. this link is to an external site that may or may not meet accessibility guidelines. Borosilicate glass is the name of a glass family with various members tailored to com… It does not expand and contract like ordinary glass does when exposed to rapid changes in heat or cold. So, why did Pyrex make the change all those years ago? Borosilicate glass or Pyrex is usually used for glassware that may be directly heated, such as beakers or boiling flasks. Pyrex is one particular blend of Borosilicate glass, with a particularly high heating tolerance.. Today, every piece of bakeware made in the U.S. uses tempered soda lime, including the full line of Pyrex consumer glassware. Borosilicate glass has a higher porportion of silicone dioxide than Soda Lime glass, as shown on the table below; This difference means that Borosilicate glass does not expand as much on heating, so it is less likely to break when heated. if you would like to know about the right type of glassware to use we have Product Guides to help you decide. When Pyrex first hit the market in 1915, it was initially made from borosilicate glass. © Copyright 2020 Meredith Corporation. Southern Living is part of the Meredith Home Group. Environmental issues aside, tempered soda lime also stands up to sudden impact better than borosilicate glass, which Pyrex says is the most common type of damage consumers are faced with. After Corning Glass Works introduced Pyrex in 1915, it became a synonym for borosilicate glass … Southern Living is a registered trademark of, These Haircuts Are Going To Be Huge in 2021, 140 Thanksgiving Side Dishes That’ll Steal the Show, 7 Paint Colors We’re Loving for Kitchen Cabinets in 2020, 50 Books Everyone Should Read in Their Lifetime. These simple and spectacular Southern cakes deserve a comeback, These sides will be the real stars of Thanksgiving dinner. To find out more, follow the links above or contact us if you need any help in choosing lab glassware; Enter you email below to receive blog updates: Borosilicate glass vs Soda Lime glass vs Pyrex…. Unfortunately when Corning, Inc. sold off the PYREX® trademark it became pyrex® in America and the new company started using Soda-Lime Glass instead of Borosilicate Glass. This difference means that Borosilicate glass does not expand as much on heating, so it is less likely to break when heated. Soda lime glass is better for the environment, requires less energy to produce, and is more easily recyclable—making it the preferable choice. Just like the vintage PYREX of yesteryear this Iced Tea Pitcher is made of laboratory grade Borosilicate Glass. Pyrex products were made of borosilicate glass until about 60 years ago, at which point they began switching to manufacturing products with tempered soda lime instead. Borosilicate Glass … WATCH: The One Thing You Need To Know About Your Pyrex Bakeware. Soda Lime glass … Soda Lime glass is sometimes used for glassware which is not likely to be directly and strongly heated, for example petri dishes or TLC chromatography tanks. Win A FREE 25 Piece Set Of PYREX | Enter Here, How Can You Tell If PYREX Is Borosilicate, How can you tell if PYREX is borosilicate. Unfortunately when Corning, Inc. sold off the PYREX® trademark it became pyrex® in America and the new company started using Soda-Lime Glass instead of Borosilicate Glass. What you may not know is that Pyrex is no longer made of the same type of glass it once was—but, before we set you into a panic, understand that this change didn't take effect recently. Unlike other glass and ceramic cookware, Pyrex dishes could withstand extreme temperature changes, which made them a kitchen standby. ‘Tis the season to ditch your all-white palette in favor of something a little bolder and brighter. This change is worth mentioning because borosilicate glass was made to withstand large and sudden temperature swings (or thermal shock) better than many other glass varieties. Though it may not be the same Pyrex glass the brand launched with in 1915, chances are, the Pyrex sitting in your cabinet is in fact just like Mama's (and Grandma's, too). As long as you use it safely and appropriately, it will stand the test of time—and serve up plenty of good casseroles for years to come. This early borosilicate glass thus came to be known as Jena glass. So perhaps appropriately, the shift from borosilicate to soda-lime glass was a big deal to Pyrex enthusiasts. Today, every piece of bakeware made in the U.S. uses tempered soda lime, including the full line of Pyrex … Increased air pollution regulations and a focus on reducing energy consumption were two of the primary causes behind the move.